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 Soviets Reschedule First Space Shuttle Launching

LEAD: The first launching of the Soviet space shuttle, scrubbed once because of a technical mishap in the final minute of countdown, has been rescheduled for Tuesday, the Tass press agency announced today.

The first launching of the Soviet space shuttle, scrubbed once because of a technical mishap in the final minute of countdown, has been rescheduled for Tuesday, the Tass press agency announced today.

Tass also announced that two Soviet astronauts broke a 326-day record for endurance in space today.

Tass said the astronauts on the space station Mir, Col. Vladimir Titov, the 41-year-old flight commander, and Musa Manarov, 37, the engineer, broke the record established last year by their colleague, Col. Yuri V. Romanenko.

Colonel Titov and Mr. Manarov were reported healthy with only small changes in their weight and muscle measurements. Scientists worry about atrophy when humans spend long periods in zero gravity in space using just a fraction of their strength. The Mir astronauts are scheduled to be relieved by two other Soviet astronauts so they may return to earth Dec. 21. A Prelude to Manned Flights

The first attempt to launch the shuttle Buran, on Oct. 29, ended 51 seconds before scheduled lift-off when a piece of equipment on the launching pad failed to move away from the unmanned craft. The Buran shuttle is due to lift off at 6 A.M. Tuesday. Tass said that if the unmanned double orbit was successful, officials would begin planning routine flights with a crew.

Soviet officials said the Buran and other Soviet shuttle craft would shoot off into space ''no more than two to four times a year.'' Tass did not clarify whether that meant each shuttle would fly only four times a year or whether the entire fleet would make just four flights a year.

A spokesman for the Soviet commercial space agency Glavkosmos said several shuttles were being built.

The Soviets have not said how many shuttles they plan to build. But they will continue to use simpler, less expensive rockets to put satellites into orbit, and save the shuttles for repair and hauling cargo to the Mir space station. QUESTION ON CREW'S DEATH

MIAMI, Nov. 12 (AP) - The seven crew members aboard the space shuttle Challenger, which exploded 72 seconds after launching, might have survived and lived the 2 1/2 minutes it took the craft to fall to the ocean, a newspaper reports.

The Miami Herald's Sunday magazine, Tropic, quoted anonymous investigators of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, who said the crew survived the explosion and died when the cabin, possibly still pressurized, crash in the ocean at 200 m.p.h.

The magazine reported that no evidence was found that the cabin lost pressure, and if it did, it did so slowly, without the sudden loss of air that would have knocked the astronauts out within seconds. NASA VOICES DOUBTS

Two exhaustive studies after the Challenger accident failed to determine the exact time or cause of the astronaut's death, and NASA officials and other experts said today they doubted there was any new evidence on which to base a claim that the astronauts had lived a relatively long time after the explosion. Shirley Green, director of public affairs at NASA, said: ''Basically, we feel the investigation was as thorough as could be. No attempt has been made to cover up any information.''

Ms. Green said that NASA investigators had reported earlier that the Challenger crew might have been alive and conscious 7 to 15 seconds after the explosion.

The agency had also reported evidence that some members of the crew had apparently activated their emergency oxygen systems immediately after the explosion. This move was a reason for concluding that they had not died in the explosion.

An examination of the wreckage and autopsies of the bodies, conducted by the Air Force Institute of Pathology, did not produce sufficient evidence to determine the cause of deaths.

New York Times. AP